Air Conditioner Efficiency

Consumer Energy Information:
EREC Fact Sheets

Air Conditioner Efficiency

Each air conditioner has an energy-efficiency rating that lists how many Btu per hour are removed for each watt of power it draws. For room air conditioners, this efficiency rating is the Energy Efficiency Ratio, or EER. For central air conditioners, it is the Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio, or SEER. These ratings are posted on an Energy Guide Label, which must be conspicuously attached to all new air conditioners. Many air conditioner manufacturers are participants in the voluntary EnergyStar labeling program. Energy Star-labeled appliances mean that they have high EER and SEER ratings.

In general, new air conditioners with higher EERs or SEERs sport higher price tags. However, the higher initial cost of an energy-efficient model will be repaid to you several times during its life span. Your utility company may encourage the purchase of a more efficient air conditioner by rebating some or all of the price difference. Buy the most efficient air conditioner you can afford, especially if you use (or think you will use) an air conditioner frequently and/or if your electricity rates are high.

Central Air Conditioners – SEER

National minimum standards for central air conditioners require a SEER of 13.0, for single-package and split-systems, respectively. But you do not need to settle for the minimum standard – there is a wide selection of units with SEERs reaching nearly 21.

Before 1979, the SEERs of central air conditioners ranged from 4.5 to 8.0. Replacing a 1970s-era central air conditioner with a SEER of 6 with a new unit having a SEER of 13 will cut your air conditioning costs in half.

For additional information click on the appropriate links below:

Energy-Efficient Air Conditioning
Maintaining Existing Air Conditioners
Regular Maintenance
Buying New Air Conditioners/Sizing New Air Conditioners
Air Conditioner Efficiency
Hiring a Professional Contractor
Installation and Location of Air Conditioners
Energy Conservation Tips

Information Provided by: Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Network (EREN) U.S. Department of Energy

If you have any further questions or would like to schedule a service call, please feel free to contact Air Repair Inc. at 972-625-1400.